Intersystems get new contract for Scottish Patient Management System

After an eighteen month procurement process Intersystem have won the contract to supply NHS Scotland with their Patient Management System, TrakCare. The PMS includes general hospital patient administration, including mental health patient administration, scheduling and results reporting. There are other additional modules that can be integrated.

GPs to target those with multiple health issues

Taking a radical look at how Scottish healthcare services are organised
Taking a radical look at how Scottish healthcare services are organised

Published on 11 Sep 2009

Family doctors can do more to help patients with multiple long-term conditions such as obesity, heart disease and arthritis, according to researchers.

A team from the University of Glasgow is to work with Stirling and Dundee universities as well as four GP practices to develop new ways to work with patients.

Funded by the Scottish Government, the £820,000 Living Well with Multiple Morbidity programme will focus on those in deprived areas where such conditions are more common, strike earlier and tend to have a disproportionate impact on people’s quality of life.

Researchers will investigate a range of measures that could help patients with multiple morbidity – two or more co-existing medical conditions – to manage their conditions and improve quality of life. It will also look at how changes to the NHS primary care system could improve care for patients and make practices more efficient.

To read more CLICK HERE

New initiative which helps older people could save NHS Lothian £150,000 a year

TWO frail pensioners who fell in their homes last week received help within minutes thanks to new state-of-the-art alarms.

The pair were among the first to be given the new neck pendant alarm connected direct to support staff under a joint city council and NHS Lothian scheme.

In one case, a 90-year-old man from the east of the city landed on his kitchen floor last Wednesday, but within 15 minutes carers arrived to bring him to his feet.

The previous day, a woman, aged 92, from the north-west, fell on her living room floor, also activating a neck alarm, allowing staff to arrive quickly to check her over.

It comes as the Telecare Falls Project is being rolled out across the city, introducing electronic detectors in properties where residents are known to be at risk.

The £120,000 initiative will help around 300 people over the next year.

Councillor Paul Edie, health and social care convener, said: “A fall can shake people’s confidence and leave them isolated. They become worried about leaving their home for routine trips to the shops or even moving too far from the safety of a particular room.

“If we can rebuild their self-belief then they can literally rebuild their lives and grasp back their independence.”

The detectors are linked to a 24/7 mobile support team which will respond to a fall within minutes, potentially saving NHS Lothian £150,000 and 1,000 hospital bed days a year.

Every year across the UK, falls account for 10 per cent of acute hospital admissions, resulting in NHS spending of £1.7 billion and 70,000 fractured hips.

to read more of this article CLICK HERE

Consultant physician Andrew Whitehouse discusses the problem of "bed-blocking"

Here is an opportunity to use Technology more effectively.

Andrew Whitehouse
VIEWPOINT
By Dr Andrew Whitehouse
Consultant physician, West Midlands


Elderly man in hospital
Elderly people have to remain in hospital until social care is arranged

Bed-blocking is an ongoing problem for the health service, with elderly patients stuck in hospital waiting for their long-term care to be arranged.

In this week’s Scrubbing Up health column, Dr Andrew Whitehouse says the answer is to merge health and social services budgets – so elderly people get more streamlined care.

Why do we waste so much money treating our elderly so badly?

Every time I do my ward rounds I find, like other physicians, that roughly a third of my patients do not need to be in hospital.

We deal with the medical and rehabilitation needs of our elderly rather efficiently and we agree the way forward with the patient and her relatives.

When discharge is prescribed, we advise the social services department of any care needs the patient has.


It costs about £700 a day to keep a patient in hospital, and about £700 a week for a decent full-time nursing home placement

This may be for a home care visitor package to assist dressing or washing. It may be for residential or nursing home placement.

Then the wait begins.

The social services department has its own procedures for deciding on what, when and how to deliver, and of course we comply with these procedures diligently and promptly.

Indeed we begin to think about the plan for discharge at the point of admission.

But despite this cooperation long delays are routine; delays which dreadfully distress the elderly and their families for whom these may be precious last months or years, delays which result in hospital acquired infections and depression, and which mean the beds cannot be used for those who really should be in hospital.

Read the rest of the article HERE

NHS Lothian Medical Director supports electronic medical records

Here is a letter from Dr Charles Swainson in the Evening News.

Centralised records improve healthcare
I was dismayed to read Dr John Welford’s letter, “System to blame for record losses, not medical staff” (News, 31 July).

Centralisation and computerisation of medical records have little to do with losing patients’ confidential medical information.

The mass computerisation he mentions refers to the introduction of a modern patient management system in NHS Lothian, TRAK, which is gradually building an electronic medical record for each patient. Currently it contains basic demographic data and contact details, service attended, laboratory and radiology results, and letters. Other key parts of the records, such as operation notes, are held on a computerised surgical database which is looked after by the surgeons.

There are huge advantages to these systems in terms of providing faster, safer healthcare. Each patient may benefit from the expertise of an extensive medical team, all working from different locations. They may be receiving care from a team including their GP, radiologists, oncologists and other health professionals. Hosting these records centrally, in one place, cuts delay and allows every member of the team access to full information on the patient to inform their expert contribution to that person’s care.
Dr Charles Swainson, medical director, NHS Lothian

Link to page

iSOFT Secures Future in Northern Ireland with £8.4 Million Agreement

Australia’s largest listed health information technology company today announced contract extensions in Northern Ireland totalling £8.4 million (A$17.4 million) for long-term support and maintenance services of its health information systems, including an option for one of the hospitals to progress to iSOFT’s next-generation Lorenzo solution.

Under the agreements with the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety, iSOFT will continue to provide services until 2015 for its Clinicom patient management system to all nine of the major acute hospitals that currently use the solution. The deal includes the right to use Lorenzo at one of the hospitals until 2015.

iSOFT also agreed to support its primary care solution with 68 GP practices for a further three years, with an option to extend this contract by an additional year. In both cases, iSOFT is offering new functions, some of which are specific to the health system in Northern Ireland.

More HERE

NHS National Services Scotland Selects Lumension to Protect Vital Information

Friday, 24 July 2009 Lumension®, the global leader in operational endpoint security, has been selected by NHS National Services Scotland to enforce security policies governing the storage of data on portable storage devices such as laptops, USB sticks and CDs or DVDs. NHS National Services Scotland procures IT software on behalf of the 22 Scottish Health Boards. The organisation is responsible for delivering the best value for public money when new information security products are sourced.

The “Data Handling Procedures in UK Government” report, published by the Information Commissioner’s office in June 2008, highlighted the need to restrict access to public sector data and to encrypt data held on removable storage devices. Following its publication, the Scottish Government made £1million available to the Scottish Health Boards to enable them to comply with the latest data handling requirements. The report led to rigorous product specifications being developed for the procurement of information security products by public sector departments throughout the UK.

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