GPs to target those with multiple health issues

Taking a radical look at how Scottish healthcare services are organised
Taking a radical look at how Scottish healthcare services are organised

Published on 11 Sep 2009

Family doctors can do more to help patients with multiple long-term conditions such as obesity, heart disease and arthritis, according to researchers.

A team from the University of Glasgow is to work with Stirling and Dundee universities as well as four GP practices to develop new ways to work with patients.

Funded by the Scottish Government, the £820,000 Living Well with Multiple Morbidity programme will focus on those in deprived areas where such conditions are more common, strike earlier and tend to have a disproportionate impact on people’s quality of life.

Researchers will investigate a range of measures that could help patients with multiple morbidity – two or more co-existing medical conditions – to manage their conditions and improve quality of life. It will also look at how changes to the NHS primary care system could improve care for patients and make practices more efficient.

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Hospital patient safety improving

surgeons washing hands
Pre-operative checklists are being implemented to cut infection rates

Simple changes to the way patients are
cared for in hospital are having a significant impact on infection
rates, according to the Scottish Government.

Hospitals are being urged to adopt stricter treatment regimes as a way of cutting
hospital deaths by 15% and “adverse incidents” by 30%.

Health Secretary Nicola Sturgeon is highlighting the measures as part of Patient Safety Month.

She visited Stirling Royal Infirmary where infection rates are down.

Prior to adopting a stricter treatment regime, the hospital recorded at least one incident per month where a patient who required a “central line” tube for food or medication, suffered from bacterial infection.

However, NHS Forth Valley said new procedures had resulted in no cases of infection being recorded since January last year.

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Edinburgh City Council's "telecare" scheme monitors elderly people in their homes

THOUSANDS of hospital and care-home beds are set to be freed up in the next year, with funds for remote monitoring more than doubling.

Edinburgh City Council is spending up to £1 million on “telecare” packages to help people stay in their own homes.

Measures include sensors that turn off cookers, GPS trackers for people with Alzheimer’s and alarms so elderly residents can call for help.

In the past three years, the city council has spent an average of £405,000 on telecare. This year it is rising to £950,000 as the services are offered to more people.

Read more HERE